Hummer Time! The Rise, Fall, and Potential Comeback of America's Iconic Vehicle

November 20, 2019
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received a mixed review from the public. For some, it is the symbol of pure power, utility, and all-American. While for others, it was an icon of full consumption, excess, and downright extra. But love it or hate it, nobody can deny that it is one of the most recognizable vehicles of all time. This GM-made monster was a hit around the world for a decade and a half, but since then, they have experienced a steady decline. So whatever happened to Hummer? And what's its future going to be now that the rumor of its electric comeback is spreading? You will just have to find out!



The History and the Rise of Hummer


90s kids could probably still remember the old days when they watched a crucial game on TV, and the Hummer commercial came on. "Conquer the world," the ad says. And a big, bulky, armorial vehicle car comes along. I guess it could conquer the world - and somehow, they did. But did you know that the Hummer was a product of an actor's imagination? Indeed, it was Terminator himself, Arnold Schwarzenegger, who came with such an idea and presented it to General Motos to sell. So how did all of that happen?


It all started in 1992 when AM General revealed the Hummer as a civilian's answer to Humvee. A lot of people in public, including Austrian-American Actor Schwarzenegger, demanded that the Humvee should be available for public consumption. But since the Humvee is a military-grade vehicle, driving it for civilian and casual purposes is illegal. When this came to Schwarzenneger's attention, he went to AM General and implored them to create a civilian version of Humvee. Thus, the Hummer was born.


And the rest, as they say, is history. Hummer became one of the most famous American vehicles in the 90s. Taking advantage of its rising popularity, AM General continued creating the said vehicle - which they now called the Hummer. In 1998, AM General sold the Hummer rights to GM - by then, they now called it the H1. GM offered three variations for the H1. These are the Alpha Wagon, the convertible soft top, and the four-door SUV - all three varieties became a hit to the public.